Goodbye London, Hello Madrid!

This week I became a big girl and moved to a foreign country. The stress of organising my trip and getting all the paperwork done for this process was worth it. Of the little I have seen of you, you’ve been beautiful, Madrid, and I can tell it’s only going to get better from here. I can’t wait for the semester to kick start! #UC3M #Erasmus2015 #HalaMadrid

Photo 12-09-2015 22 01 18

Summer Jobs:

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As well as taking a break from studying, a Summer job is the perfect opportunity to build up some experience in your areas of interest as well as help keep busy during this long break. Though the prospect of applications can be daunting, a good starting point is to research a few openings you may be interested in and start to construct a CV.

Here’s a few tips I found effective when applying for jobs and constructing a CV:

Rule number 1: Don’t be generic: Like a cover letter, you shouldn’t circulate the same CV to every job you apply for.

A great way to catch an employers attention is to take what qualities they’re looking for in the provided job description and tailor your experiences and the skills you gained from these experiences toward this description. For example, if a job requires you to work effectively in a team and you have retail experience, emphasise on how you had to work as a part of the store’s team in order to reach the store’s targets.

Rule number 2: Keep Concise: Your CV shouldn’t be more than a page long.

I know it’s difficult to fit all of your education, work experience and skills all on one page but a CV that’s more than a page long and full of sentences is most likely not going to be read all the way through. With this being said, you want to keep concise, but avoid just listing – bullet point the important points and anything extra can be written about in your cover letter or expanded upon in interviews.

Rule number 3: Languages

Languages are a highly desirable skill among employers so it seems like a good idea to highlight your GCSE in French, which is fine, but this doesn’t entitle you to say you’re fluent in French. Be honest about the level at which you are able to communicate in, if you’re really struggling to pin-point where you fall on the proficiency scale, take a quick look at the ILR website: http://www.govtilr.org/index.htm

Rule number 4: Don’t lie!

Although it may sound like a good idea to brag about having extensive experience in order to get a job, this only puts you in a sticky situation when you’re asked to illustrate these abilities though are unable to do so!